You'll find a little of everything here. Genres covered in this blog include (so far) prehistorics, fantasy, old west, swashbucklers, pulp, Blood Bowl, Ghostbusters, gladiators, nautical, science fiction and samurai in 6mm, 15mm, 28mm, 40mm, 42mm and 54mm sizes. You'll also find terrain, scenery, basing, gaming, modeling, tutorials, repaints, conversions, art and thoughts in general about the hobby.


Sunday, October 8, 2017

40mm Samurai

Over the past few months, I've commissioned three more figures through Steve Barber Models. I look forward to adding them to my 40mm Japanese collection.
I have plenty of samurai, so the last few (and next couple) commissions have been of civilians. The first of these recent three is a woodsman resting with his ax to the ground, bound with a protective, woven blade cover. All those other samurai have plenty of grimacing and other war faces expressed in their sculpting, so I chose to have my woodsman smiling.

I've also commissioned a peasant women carrying a pack. I always look for opportunities for conversions with these commissions, so the woman will have a separate, empty-handed arm, so that a tool or bucket can be placed in it. Steve and I also talked and mentioned she could be holding the hand of a young child. Always plenty of ideas.

Steve also sculpted two separate different pack options for her: A basket full of persimmons to be sold at market, or a bundle of firewood (with which she could make a good companion piece with the woodsman.) The woodsman also has a separate pack that can probably be used with the peasant woman. So between the pack options and the open hand, you could get three or four of these figures, and convert each one into a completely different personage.

Next up will be a figure commonly seen in most Japanese/samurai miniature collections: The Komuso Monk. Now here's the thing. It seems there are quite a few 28mm komuso (and Komuso in gaming/pulp art) who carry a sword -- one of the monks in the upcoming Rising Tides game, for example. As the legend/myth goes, the costume was a great way for samurai/ninja/operatives to sneak up or observe the enemy unnoticed.

No, I want my komuso to actually be a monk, simply zenning out on his shakuhachi. All my other monks are already armed to the teeth, so I'm letting this fellow walk in peace. No sword will be included.

(Maybe I'm way off course here; Any historians out there? Did some Komuso carry a sword? It also seems, if you're using the costume as a disguise, the sword might give you away. Really, I'm only going on what I've seen -- I admittedly haven't read to much on the subject. But I know enough that the sculpt without a sword will be just fine.)

And here are some more photos of my current collection for you to enjoy :)






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